uprooted

The final blog in a series by SPARC Guest Blogger Denise Lysak.

 

I will start my last blog, by raising a glass to writers everywhere. storytellers playwrights songwriters

i am simply taking on a role that was not assigned to me
I am the raconteur and in this, my last blog, for SPARC, I will share with you my observations from the Northern Ontario Touring Conference (NOTC) that took place in November

over the course of three consecutive Thursdays.

It was led by amazing facilitators and the host organization was Pat the Dog. If you are curious about their mission and mandate, I encourage you to google Pat the Dog.

Here is the Link: Pat the Dog

this last blog is intended to ignite          to spark          to be deeply personal

For so many of us, COVID-19 is challenging our very existence. Touring is cancelled. Theatres remain closed. Arts spaces are shuttered. we as a community are confronting more than one

Crisis.
a health crisis      an economic crisis          and, dare I say. An Identity Crisis.

So many people in so many communities

Are desperate. For RELIEF. For HOPE. For the Seuss-like world

we are living in

to be OVER. No offense to theodor seuss geisel

The Grinch is peeking out from a green face mask. The words 'Six Feet People" are to the left of his face. Only his eyes, part of his nose and one hand are shown.

Friends are out of work. Projects on hold. people have been uprooted. missions and mandates collect dust just like

 

Elf on a Shelf

An Elf on the Shelf toy sits inside a glass jar, a countdown calendar sits belies the jar - counting down the days until the elf is out of quarantine

participants in the conference, yes a virtual conference, online, with no doughnuts in the morning, no drinks in the evening, no hugs in green rooms or rehearsal halls or lobby bars

were asked to share BIG IDEAS, to reference the past to talk about the present to look at the

f             u            t                u                 r            e

If this is hard to read

Know that is intentional

If this is uncomfortable

GOOD

Yes. The breakout rooms were aspirational. Yes. The icebreakers were fun and I might even steal a game or two to use in future zoomESQUE meetings. Yes. The gym classes gave new meaning to

Yogis everywhere. And, if you ever wondered what clowning is like for the uninitiated; make new friends.Look for Aga Boom, run-away Cirque clowns when they return to the stage.Take your kids to theatre school and enroll them in a clowning class. Go to an outdoor festival and say “hello” to a clown.

ARTS and culture

Like Trade, like agriculture, like the sciences

are tools to harness the power of people to be better, to elevate

the humanities for the

common good.

We need to fight like hell to be here, to get to the other side, to be relevant once again.How do we forge opportunity out of crisis, out of a convergences of crises?I have no illusions about the long road ahead of us. About the difficulties and obstacles in our way.

We can do anything!
We can be anything.
Imagine.
Transform.
Innovate.
Create.
With confidence. With boldness. And, above all with a new agenda.

So that artists can shape

our landscapes and skylines

for audiences everywhere

in 2021 and BEYOND

It is not lost on me that we

all

rise

or

fall

together.

And, here we are with a different kind of holiday season before us.Who will go                                                                                                                                                            caroling?

Who will deck the halls?

Who will serve up figgy puddings?

So as we continue to #shelterinplace and #stayhome, please watch

Snoopy’s Christmas vs The Red Baron by The Royal Guardsmen

Attending the conference was a gift. Being a guest blogger for SPARC was a gift. You have given my words space to fly.

And, in the spirit of giving as people across the globe celebrate

 

Snoopy sits in front of a red kennel. It has snow on the roof, gifts and Christmas lights. The Title is Snoopy's ChristmasHanukkah                                                                                                                                             Kwanzaa                                                                                                                                        Christmas,

 

 

 

 

I will end where I started. With a toast to the writers. In this case, songwriters.

Daniel, Daniel, and Sheena.

Yes, there are

two

daniels.

This is my wish for all of you…

A SIMPLE KIND OF CHRISTMAS in a complicated time by

Red Moon Road

 

Creative Spaces – a Photo Essay

Our Guest Blog this month is a photographic essay with text by Dee Lysak and photos by Wanda Kabel-Easton.

 

The still images are shared in black and white. They represent a mapping of cultural spaces – up and down the King’s Highway #71, in the Township of Sioux Narrows-Nestor Falls.  Rural and remote communities and the people that reside there, alongside of their urban counterparts, are living through a once-in-a-lifetime global health pandemic. This photo essay explores the sad reality of so many spaces that are  shuttered, indefinitely. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

black & white photo - the outdoor stage for the Moose & Fiddle Festival, a wooden structure with a roof and no floor or sides

I sit empty. Vacant. Waiting. Wood beams, pine boards, asphalt shingles. The quiet surrounds me.

This summer – the woodland friends kept me company. The blue heron in the reeds on Caliper Lake. The blue jays. Nuthatches.  Jackrabbits.  The sounds are familiar, yet others are missing.

I am purpose built. I am an outdoor stage for the Moose n’ Fiddle Music Festival. I need musicians: singer-songwriters, guitar players, drummers. I miss the audience. Where has everyone gone?

 

 

 

 

black & white photo of a boat exhibit. a small speed boat is left with a sign in front of it with a fish and writing on it - the writing is not erasable, other exhibits are in the background to the right

Imagine. Tables and chairs. A painter’s workshop.  Folk art. Tyler Boyle. Bridge & Falls Creative Residency. A potter. A writer. A playwright. A geologist. A reading. Artist talkback.

People entering. Take your seat. People. All walks of life. Indigenous. Non-Indigenous. Young and old. The lights dim. A live performance of AN ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF THE ANISHINAABE by Ian Ross. Performed by Ian Ross and James Durham. Laughter. Applause. Cold brew coffee. Pastries. Q+A. Conversation.

In the here and now, all alone. Waiting. Patiently. For the next act. For friends to come again. Enter. Exit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

black& white photo - a wooden and glass structure sits on the edge of a hill, forest behind it

Wood. Light. Air. Sun. Wind. Rain. 

I am ON THE ROCK. I am the inspiration. Artist-centred. To work. To create. To take deep dives into artistic practices. Creative minds. Come and go. The window opens. The cool breeze rushes in.  Poet’s linger. Laptops. iPhones. Pencils. Paper. Voices. Movement. Artists play.

I am ON THE ROCK. I am transformed. I am a satellite performance space. Playing now. 14 Chairs. Pop up performance. First set: Charlie Madden and Jake Blosser.  The music echoes over the Canadian Shield. Sitting here at the head of a trail.  In the deep, dark woods. Twilight is upon us. The moon rises.  

When will we meet again? Soon, I hope. 

 

 

 

 

black & white photo - a covered wooden pavilion sits on a hill. tress surround it. picnic tables are inside of it

Summer picnics. Let’s break bread together. BBQ, grills are fired up. Smokers: hickory, applewood, mesquite. In my mind’s eye. Coolers are everywhere. A buffet table.  Red + white checkerboard cover.  Side dishes. Cold salads. Condiments. Families. Aunts and Uncles. Grandma, grandpa, mom, dad, cousins. Friends.

On the lawn. Children play: hopscotch; red rover, red rover; duck, duck, goose.  Minnow races.  Dogs on and off leashes.  Beach towels. Clouds roll in. Thunder and lighting. Rainbows. Campfires. S’mores.  Sing-alongs. Ghost stories. 

Art in the Park?  Crafters. Displays. People roaming. Wifi on. Bags filled. Transaction approved. 

Shelter in place? Am I now redundant?  Do I still exist? Without living – breathing human beings, I am just a shell.

fire and water

A new piece by Guest Blogger Denise Lysak.

I will start with the words of Antoine de Saint-Exupery, “A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single person contemplates it, bearing within her the image of a cathedral.” I think this is a perfectly good place to kick-start this blog titled ‘fire and water’.  

The Moving Gallery is just a tiny structure with windows, walls and wheels OR maybe, if you let yourself imagine, it is so, much more. With every artist that worked on this project – the Moving Gallery became a living, breathing exhibit and exploration around the theme of water. It was infused with original works of art: all informed by thoughts, sensibilities, care, connections, history, brush strokes, stories, photos, sketches, reflections, impulses, charisma, and courage.  

 

four children sit on a brown leather couch, adults are standing and chatting to each other behind them. Three of the children are eating, the fourth (on the left of the couch) is looking at the camera and smiling.

Photo Credit: Opening Day for the Moving Gallery, June 2017 | Northern Ontario Sportfishing Centre, Sioux Narrows, Ontario, Canada

 

Chalkboard with writing on. The top reads: Water is.... below words placed on in various places read: reflective, life source, rain, refreshing, l'eau, fun, getting polluted, tears of... pain joy, puddle and more

Photo Credit: Chalkboard Wall, Moving Gallery, Design and Build by Chrissy Sie-Merritt

 

two tree trunks made into stools are in front of a table. On the wooden table are iPods and headphones. Above the table is a painting. On the left wall are photos hung on string and a bucket hanging from the ceiling.

Photo Credit: Cherry Orchard and Photo Wall by Nicola Cavendish | Podcast Station by Ian Ross | Drop of Water Painting by Chrissy Sie-Merritt

 

A woman in a white dress with colourful stripes on the bottom - a Jingle Dress - crouches on a rock at the side of a body of water. She dangles the fingertips if her right arm in the water.

Photo Credit: Jingle Dress Photo Gallery by Kate-Lynn Paypompee

 

Photo of an oil painting of sunset over a body of water with clouds in the sky

Photo Credit: Original Painting by Chrissy Sie-Merritt

 

headshot of a caucasian male with short salt and pepper hair. He wears glasses that are black rimmed on top and without rims at the bottom. He is wearing a collared, striped shirt. There are windows in the background.

Photo Credit: Ian Ross – Governor General’s Award-Winning Playwright | Creator of Podcasts for the Moving Gallery

 

a small, low wooden table with water and blue coloured bubbles in it

Photo Credit: Water Sensory Table | Design & Build by Crissy Sie-Merritt

 

The MOVING GALLERY, is a tiny mobile studio fitted with art installations: iPods with recorded podcasts, visual art pieces, interactive exhibits, chalkboard walls, mechanical flipbooks, and ‘selfie” corners – created and developed by amateur and professional artists, from Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities across Canada. The Moving Gallery travelled to fairs, farmers’ markets, festivals and forts throughout the summer of 2017, in celebration of Canada’s sesquicentennial.  

With the Moving Gallery, audiences and artists came together in a tiny space and as you took your first step in, you were submerged in the soundscape by Gerald Laroche.  Sounds of crashing waves, rain drops and the call of the loons supported an immersive experience. The tiny studio engaged audiences in a sensory experience, from hearing and seeing to touching and feeling.  

In 2020, fires have raged and continue to destroy vast swaths of land, endangering town, cities, human life, wildlife, natural and built environs. Our work as creators is to create conversations, to evoke critical thought, to challenge perceptions, and, yes, at times, to simply entertain. The installations that were part and parcel of the Moving Gallery, celebrated in part our nation’s sesquicentennial in 2017 and the larger gift of water.  And, it is in that polar opposite that moves me to discover the dichotomy of fire and water.  

 

Fire and Water word map with many words written on it - easiest to make out are: Word, Moving Gallery, Ebb, Art, Time, Cloud, Lake, Paintings. There are many more words on the poster that are not as easy to read.

There are words in the “cloud” that jump out at me: scorched earth, evacuate, climate fire, ash, water and life. The word cloud hints at a serene landscape – with the green of mother earth veiled by the light and airy atmosphere from above – all while taking another turn around the sun, in that idea of a year.  In our utopia, this would fairly represent planet Earth and all of its inhabitants, creatures great and small. Our world view tells a very different story and suggests a reality that is far from the idyllic imagery suggested above. How do we reconcile the two?  With art.  With art that opens windows to the world.  With art that boldy illustrates the world we live in and challenges, all of us, to imagine and build an even better one.  With art that touches our souls, heals our minds, and moves our bodies to act.  Now.

THE WHO’S WHO, MOVING GALLERY                     Artistic Curator Denise Lysak

PRIMARY CREATORS                                                      TINY STUDIO DESIGN TEAM

Nicola Cavendish | Writer                                              Erik Arnason, Eduardo Aquino, Shawn 

Wanda Easton | Photographer/ Blogger                     Bailey, Chrissy Sie-Merritt, Shawn

Gerald Laroche | Soundscape Artist                            Sinclair

Kate-Lynn Paypompee | Photographer                       Elyse Hartman | Gallery Guide

Ian Ross | Storyteller

Chrissy Sie-Merritt | Visual Artist

Building Community Media

Today’s blog is an introduction to next week’s Expert Chat – My Voice Counts: Building Community Media In the Internet Age, by Victoria Fenner.

 

beige and brown portable radio with blue buttons and ed dial on the front

 

I’ve lived in a community with its own community radio station for most of my adult life. 

For the first part of my life, that was coincidental.  My first experience with community radio was at university.  Back in the 80s, that was the most common form of volunteer produced community radio.  Though based on a university campus, the mandate of campus based stations was to serve both the campus and the community. 

In recent years, especially the past ten years or so, there is a new trend developing.  Small towns all over Canada are starting their own stations.  In places like Picton, Cobourg, Stouffville, Huntsville and Haliburton, people have started their own non-profit based radio stations.  

What this means is that people can turn on the radio and hear people on the air from their community.  They can hear their own local musicians, sometimes even playing live from the studio.  It’s also not uncommon to hear poetry, radio drama and sound art on the airwaves.  The best thing for me, as a listener, is that I get to hear what my neighbours are doing. 

As a producer of sound art, it also means I can get my work on the air. My neighbours can hear me. I can also hear about exhibitions coming up, events in the community and also (if there are shows that do information programs), I can hear what my town council is doing to make sure my community is a healthy community for arts to flourish. And call them to task if they’re not.

There are many things that community media does beyond art – in this column I’m focussing mostly on performing arts because the mandate of SPARC is to promote performing arts in rural and remote communities.  Community media – radio, television, internet based or even good old fashioned newspapers, can do that.  

It’s important to have media which supports your community. A growing number of communities are realizing that the best way to ensure that the needs of the community are being met is through community ownership of its own media.  So they’re setting up their own community media organizations.  Some have radio stations, some have internet portals and some of them even have their own standalone over the air TV station. 

If this idea intrigues you, there are a few organizations who can help.  If you want to learn more about community radio, the National Campus and Community Radio Association (ncra.ca) has a list of all its members (mostly in English speaking Canada), as well as resources to read about how to set up a station.

For francophone communities, you can go to the website of ARC du Canada – Alliance des radios communitaires (https://radiorfa.com/ ).  There are also many Indigenous community radio stations in Canada.  You can also check out the website of the Community Radio Fund of Canada, https://crfc-fcrc.ca/ , an organization set up twelve years ago to help fund community radio across Canada (disclosure – I am on the board of the CRFC).

I’ve used radio as my first example because that’s the medium to which I have dedicated most of my life’s work.   Right now, I’m also branching out into community television and exploring new concepts like video gaming and virtual reality with one of my colleagues.  (another disclosure – I also work in community television too with the next organization I’m going to tell you about).

 

old fashioned television with dials on the right and rainbow stripes across the screen

 

If you’re interested in television, video gaming and virtual reality, check out CACTUS – The Canadian Association of Community Television Stations and Users (cactusmedia.ca).  CACTUS was established about ten years ago by a group of people who saw the need to support the emerging community television sector beyond the usual model of community channels owned by the big cable companies. For a whole bunch of reasons, many of those stations have been closed down, leaving communities without a way to reach each other on television.  

CACTUS’s vision includes working with communities to help them develop community media across all platforms – not just radio and television, but also community based virtual reality and video games. 

Whatever distribution method you choose, the important thing is that it’s media produced for your community by people IN your community.  Because that’s what real community media is.  It’s not just some corporation creating media FOR you.  It’s about media created BY you.

If you would like to learn more about community media, I will be doing a webinar for SPARC where I can answer your questions about what’s involved in starting a community media organization in the place where you live. 

Details about the Expert Chat: Wednesday August 26 at 7pm on the SPARC Member Network Facebook group page (click here).

VF bio:

Victoria  is a community builder through media arts.  Whether she’s facilitating an arts camp, running a community radio, television station or community internet portal; or helping community groups develop their fundraising plans, she enjoys helping people find their unique role within a shared purpose.  She integrates principles of socially engaged arts practice in her projects, conducting story circles, acoustic ecology  and participatory media arts workshops.   She is also a radio journalist and environmental sound artist who is constantly exploring new ways to listen.  She lives in Barrie with her partner, singer songwriter Edward St. Moritz.